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February 2020

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SUBHASH CHANDRA : TO HELL AND BACK

THIS is another face of capitalism, albeit an ugly one. But it is as much an inherent part of the various moods and hues of ideology. Large companies, on the brink of bankruptcy, are trying to make last-minute deals to remain profitable, or survive. But if the logic of capitalism is that the government has no business to be in business, and the private sector should run to the policy makers to be bailed out, there is only one way – keep your head above the water, or declare bankruptcy. After the Supreme Court forced the telecom companies to pay their huge dues on revenue-share to the government, this is, in fact, the way forward for several reasons.
The first is that this trend is not sector-specific. Across segments, and across size-brackets, companies are in trouble. Some of the biggest names such as Jet Airways, DHFL, IL&FS, Bhushan Steel, Essar Steel, and several others declared bankruptcy, and were sold off – often at huge discounts, or haircuts on the outstanding loans. The same rules should apply in all sectors, and telecom cannot be any different. Let Vodafone-Idea fail if it has to. In future, even if the largest Indian enterprises are on the verge of loan defaults due to burgeoning debt, they should be allowed to fail, and then rise from their ashes like a phoenix.

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gfiles is the country’s first independent magazine written, designed and produced for India’s civil services—the vast and formidable network of bureaucracies and public sector organisations that provide continuity and stability to this nation’s governance.

Every month this niche market product reaches 76,800 individuals with a universe of more than 3,50,000 readers.

Its exclusive audience consists of the men and women who lead the Indian Administrative Service (IAS), the Indian Foreign Service (IFS), the Indian Police Service (IPS), the Indian Revenue Service (IRS), Class I Union Services, as well as a host of Allied Services.

gfiles magazine edited by India’s senior most journalists who have made an intensive study of the reading preferences of decision makers and implementers in government services.

The magazine—with substantial contributions from serving and retired officers—is uniquely designed to engage the bureaucrat’s attention in the entire content.

It has therefore been divided into sections according to the specific reading needs of this target audience. While these readers flip through newspapers and general magazines, they read gfiles from page to page.

This is because gfiles magazine provides not only exclusive news unavailable anywhere else in the media or the Internet, but also focuses exclusively on the future, anticipating events and developments.

It contains detailed, extensive, and accurate reports about transfers and postings.

It features interviews, case studies, snippets, retirement profiles, financial planning advice, political changes, as well as birthdays and alumni tracking.

gfiles magazine cuts through rumour mills and hearsay and helps India’s civil servants reach out to one another, share and become acquainted with their issues, practical problems, everyday challenges and the intricacies of their working environment.

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